Frustrated Incorporated
I just want something simple, like the TRUTH!

Atlanta, Dr. Thomas Frieden’s press conference talking about the first case of Ebola virus found:

FRIEDEN: … Ebola is a scary disease because of the severity of illness it causes. At the same time, we’re stopping it in its tracks in this country. We can do that because of two things: Strong health care infection control that stops the spread of Ebola and strong core public health functions that trace contacts, track contacts, isolate them if they have any symptoms, and stop the chain of transmission. We’re stopping this in its tracks.

This is another example of just getting up there and saying it and hoping that it’s true, hoping that saying it makes it true. You know, this is not a world governed by the aggressive use of words, the aggressive use of speeches. There are powerful forces out there, and viruses and diseases are two of them, and you don’t stop them with words.

You don’t stop them with good intentions, and you don’t stop ‘em with compassion. You don’t stop ‘em by caring. You actually have to take steps.

Ebola, a virus that is affecting people thousands of miles away in West Africa, is now in America’s most populous city with the fourth diagnosis on American soil.

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has sickened at least 9,936 people since March, killing at least 4,877 of them as of Oct. 22 — making it the worst outbreak of the virus in history, according to the World Health Organization.

Find out how the virus first arrived in the United States — via U.S. missionaries flown here for treatment this summer — and then how Ebola was unwittingly imported via Thomas Eric Duncan, who flew from Liberia to Texas with the virus and later died in Dallas.

Oct. 24, 2014 – Dallas nurse Nina Pham, 26, the first person to contract Ebola in the United States, is virus-free, the National Institutes of Health announces.

Oct. 23, 2014 – Dr. Craig Allen Spencer is diagnosed with Ebola the same day he went into isolation at Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan. According to the hospital, he had a fever and gastrointestinal symptoms when he was taken to Bellevue. Spencer recently returned from Guinea, where he was working with Doctors Without Borders. NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a news conference that Spencer only had symptoms for “a very brief period of time” and only had contact with “very few” people. He described the patient as “in good shape.”

Oct. 22, 2014 – Ebola patient Amber Vinson, 29, a nurse who treated Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola on American soil, is declared virus-free at Emory University Hospital, where she was transferred after testing positive for the virus at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, where she works. Her family said she tested negative for the virus and would be moved from isolation.

Oct. 19, 2014 – The unnamed American Ebola patient is discharged from Emory University Hospital, where the patient had been undergoing care since Sept. 9. This patient had been working for the WHO in Sierra Leone and chose to remain anonymous.

Oct. 17, 2014 – Spencer arrives back in the United States via Brussels after spending a month in Guinea with Doctors Without Borders treating Ebola patients. He lands in New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport.

Oct. 17, 2014 – Officials announce that a Dallas health worker who handled clinical specimens from Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola on American soil, is quarantined aboard a Carnival cruise ship amid concerns the worker may have been exposed to the Ebola virus.

Oct. 16, 2014 – Pham is flown from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas to the National Institutes of Health hospital in Bethesda, Maryland. Pham treated Duncan at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, where she works.

Oct. 15, 2014 – Vinson is diagnosed with Ebola shortly after midnight and flown to Emory University Hospital that evening.

Oct. 14, 2014 – Vinson is taken to Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas with a fever.

Oct. 13, 2014 – Vinson flies from Cleveland to Dallas on Frontier Airlines Flight 1143, arriving at 8:16 p.m. She has no symptoms, but her temperature was 99.5 degrees that morning, according to health officials. She notified the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention before boarding, and no one told her not to fly.

Oct. 12, 2014 – Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas says that Pham has tested positive for Ebola.

Oct. 12, 2014 – An unidentified Dallas health worker who handled Duncan’s clinical specimens at Texas Healthy Presbyterian Hospital boards a cruise ship. The CDC notified the worker about active monitoring after the cruise ship left the country, according to a government statement.

Oct. 10, 2014 – Vinson takes a commercial flight from Dallas to Cleveland, Ohio, to prepare for her upcoming wedding.

Oct. 9, 2014 – A Dallas County sheriff’s deputy who reported symptoms associated with Ebola after serving a quarantine order on the apartment where Duncan had been staying tests negative for the virus.

Oct. 8, 2014 – Duncan dies at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.

Oct. 6, 2014 – Ashoka Mukpo, 33, a freelance American cameraman who contracted Ebola in West Africa, arrives at Nebraska Medical Center for Ebola treatment.

Oct. 6, 2014 – Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, who contracted Ebola while treating patients in a Liberian maternity ward a month earlier, is released from his second hospitalization since returning to the United States. He had been hospitalized at UMass Memorial Medical Center on Worcester, Massachusetts, with what doctors initially thought was an Ebola relapse but soon diagnosed as a respiratory infection.

Oct. 5, 2014 – Sacra hospitalized in Massachusetts with what doctors fear is an Ebola relapse. They isolate him out of what they said was an abundance of caution.

Oct. 2, 2014 – Mukpo is diagnosed with Ebola in Liberia. He worked for Vice News, NBC News and other outlets.

Sept. 30, 2014 – The CDC confirms that a patient who would later be identified as Duncan has been diagnosed with Ebola on U.S. soil.

Sept. 28, 2014 – Duncan returns to the hospital in an ambulance and is isolated.

Sept. 26, 2014 – Duncan goes to Texas Presbyterian Health Hospital in Dallas with a fever and tells a nurse he has been to Liberia. But he is sent home with antibiotics and Tylenol.

Sept. 20, 2014 – Duncan arrives in the United States from Liberia to visit family.

Sept. 9, 2014 – An unnamed American Ebola patient arrives at Emory University Hospital for treatment. This patient had been working for the WHO in Sierra Leone.

Sept. 5, 2014 – Sacra arrives at Nebraska Medical Center for treatment. He eventually gets a blood transfusion from Dr. Kent Brantly, the American missionary who survived his bout with Ebola.

Sept. 3, 2014 – Sacra was diagnosed with Ebola even though he was treating patients in the maternity ward of the ELWA Hospital in Monrovia, Liberia, not Ebola patients.

Aug. 21, 2014 – Dr. Kent Brantly, 33, is discharged from Emory University Hospital, where he was undergoing treatment for Ebola after contracting it in Africa. In a news conference, he hugs several members of the hospital staff.

Aug. 19, 2014 – Missionary Nancy Writebol, 59, is quietly discharged from Emory University Hospital, where she was undergoing treatment for Ebola. She also contracted the virus doing aid work in Liberia.

Aug. 5, 2014 – Writebol is flown from Liberia to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, for Ebola treatment in its isolation ward.

Aug. 2, 2014 – Brantly is flown from Liberia to Emory for treatment. He surprises everyone by walking out of the ambulance into the hospital in his protective suit.

July 31, 2013 – In Liberia, Brantly gets the first dose of an experimental drug called ZMapp, though it was unnamed at the time. Though doctors initially thought there was only enough for one person, Writebol was administered the drug as well.

July 27, 2014 – Missionary groups report that two Americans are sickened with Ebola while helping patients in Monrovia, Liberia. Brantly and Writebol were working for aid groups Samaritan’s Purse and SIM, respectively. Brantly later told reporters he held patients’ hands as they were dying.

March 19, 2014 – What would become the largest Ebola outbreak in history begins in March 2014 with 23 deaths from what is then called a “mystery” hemorrhagic fever.

SourceABC news

2014 Economic Facts…

Most people are still earning less, adjusted for inflation, than before the recession struck at the end of 2007. Even many who kept their jobs through the recession — or easily found work after being let go — are no better off. The typical family income in current dollars is $52,959, according to Sentier Research. Factoring in inflation, that’s $3,303 less than before the recession — a nearly 6 percent drop.

FEWER FULL-TIME JOBS

Finding a steady full-time job has become harder. There are 27.4 million part-time jobs, representing 18.8 percent of jobs in the U.S. economy, according to the Labor Department. Before the recession, 16.5 percent of all jobs were part time.

BEHIND ON MORTGAGES

Whatever wealth most Americans have is mainly tied up in their homes. But roughly seven years after the housing bust, owning a home has still been a bad investment for many.

Nearly 37 percent of mortgage holders were “effectively underwater” through the first three months of 2014, according to the real estate firm Zillow. That means they either owe more than their homes are worth or a sale wouldn’t generate enough money to cover the closing costs and down payment for a new home.

Just 39 percent of everyone surveyed in June said the economy was improving; 56 percent described it as getting worse. The consumer confidence reading for existing conditions was, negative 14.

CAUTIOUS SHOPPING

Most Americans are still being careful at cash registers and online checkouts. Consumer spending has risen at an average annual pace of just 2.2 percent since the recession ended in mid-2009. That’s far below the 3.4 percent average in the two decades preceding the recession.

Confidence in the economy is still relatively low, suggesting that people are buying what they need instead of what they want. The Conference Board’s consumer confidence index was 85.2 in June. In the 20 years preceding the downturn, it averaged nearly 102. 1

So, how is Obama Economics working out for you?

The fundamental reason why all this is happening is the pie that everybody wants a piece of… That’s just the private sector. When the government comes in and absorbs one-sixth of it in the health care takeover called Obamacare, the pie gets smaller.

As government grows, how does it grow?

It has to take money from other people, allocate it to itself to spend it however it wishes. It’s called redistribution; it doesn’t produce anything. The private sector is getting smaller. The pie is all getting smaller, and that’s why there’s less of it to be had for people. You want to talk about why the gap between rich and poor is expanding? It’s because the pie’s getting smaller, and the pie can only get smaller as government grows.

That’s the argument against government expansion in its simplest form. The argument against government expansion is that it shrinks opportunity for everybody who doesn’t work or have anything to do with government.

Now… Lets take a look at President Obama’s view on our Economy:

WASHINGTON (MarketWatch) July 9, 2014 — President Barack Obama took credit on Wednesday for the U.S. economic rebound after the financial crisis of 2008.

“Thanks to the hard work of you – and some actually smart policies by us, we have come further and recovered faster than almost any other advanced country on Earth,”

Obama said in a campaign-style speech in Denver. Obama trumpeted an agenda of “economic patriotism,” … 2

 Seriously, this man lies to the American Public on a regular basis about a multitude of topics, why should he – after 6 years – start letting facts get in the way??

1 Source: AP: AS US JOB MARKET STRENGTHENS, MANY DON’T FEEL IT
2 Source: MarketWatch: Obama: U.S. economic recovery among fastest on earth

Since the Election of Barack Hussein Obama II…

2009

Feb. 9, Iraq: a suicide bomber kills four American soldiers and their Iraqi translator near a police checkpoint.

April 10, Iraq: a suicide attack kills five American soldiers and two Iraqi policemen.

June 1, Little Rock, Arkansas: Abdulhakim Muhammed, a Muslim convert from Memphis, Tennessee, is charged with shooting two soldiers outside a military recruiting center. One is killed and the other is wounded. In a January 2010 letter to the judge hearing his case, Muhammed asked to change his plea from not guilty to guilty, claimed ties to al-Qaeda, and called the shooting a jihadi attack “to fight those who wage war on Islam and Muslims.”

Dec. 25: A Nigerian man on a flight from Amsterdam to Detroit attempted to ignite an explosive device hidden in his underwear. The explosive device that failed to detonate was a mixture of powder and liquid that did not alert security personnel in the airport. The alleged bomber, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, told officials later that he was directed by the terrorist group Al Qaeda. The suspect was already on the government’s watch list when he attempted the bombing; his father, a respected Nigerian banker, had told the U.S. government that he was worried about his son’s increased extremism.

Dec. 30, Iraq: a suicide bomber kills eight Americans civilians, seven of them CIA agents, at a base in Afghanistan. It’s the deadliest attack on the agency since 9/11. The attacker is reportedly a double agent from Jordan who was acting on behalf of al-Qaeda.

2010

May 1, New York City: a car bomb is discovered in Times Square, New York City after smoke is seen coming from a vehicle. The bomb was ignited, but failed to detonate and was disarmed before it could cause any harm. Times Square was evacuated as a safety precaution. Faisal Shahzad pleads guilty to placing the bomb as well as 10 terrorism and weapons charges.

May 10, Jacksonville, Florida: a pipe bomb explodes while approximately 60 Muslims are praying in the mosque. The attack causes no injuries.

Oct. 29: two packages are found on separate cargo planes. Each package contains a bomb consisting of 300 to 400 grams (11-14 oz) of plastic explosives and a detonating mechanism. The bombs are discovered as a result of intelligence received from Saudi Arabia’s security chief. The packages, bound from Yemen to the United States, are discovered at en route stop-overs, one in England and one in Dubai in the United Arab Emirates.

2011

Jan. 17, Spokane, Washington: a pipe bomb is discovered along the route of the Martin Luther King, Jr. memorial march. The bomb, a “viable device” set up to spray marchers with shrapnel and to cause multiple casualties, is defused without any injuries.

2012

Sept. 11, Benghazi, Libya: militants armed with antiaircraft weapons and rocket-propelled grenades fire upon the American consulate, killing U.S. ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens and three other embassy officials. U.S. secretary of state Hillary Clinton said the U.S. believed that Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, a group closely linked to Al Qaeda, orchestrated the attack.

President Obama in Mount Vernon, Iowa – 10/17/2012

2013

Feb. 1, Ankara, Turkey: Ecevit Sanli detonates a bomb near a gate at the U.S. Embassy. Sanli dies after detonating the bomb. One Turkish guard is also killed. Didem Tuncay, a respected television journalist, is injured in the blast. Unlike the bombing at the embassy in Benghazi last September, the U.S. government immediately calls the bombing a terrorist attack. According to Turkish officials, the attack is from the Revolutionary People’s Liberation Party, which has been labeled a terrorist organization by the U.S. and other nations.

April 15, Boston, Mass.: multiple bombs explode near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Two bombs go off around 2:50 in the afternoon as runners finish the race. Three people are killed. One is an eight year old boy. More than 260 people are injured. Three days later, the FBI releases photos and video of two suspects in the hope that the public can help identify them. Just hours after the FBI releases the images, the two suspects rob a gas station in Central Square then shoot and kill a MIT police officer in his car. Afterwards, the two men carjack a SUV and tell the driver that they had set off the explosions at the marathon. Police pursue the vehicle into Watertown. During the shootout, a MBTA officer is shot and one of the suspects, identified as Tamerlan Tsarnaev, age 26, is killed. A suicide vest is found on his body. The other suspect, Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, age 19, remains at large for several hours, causing a massive manhunt and lockdown for all of Boston, Cambridge, and many other surrounding communities. The manhunt ends when he is found alive, but seriously injured, hiding in a boat behind a house in Watertown. The two suspects are brothers and had been living together in Cambridge. They have lived in the U.S. for about a decade, but are from an area near Chechnya, a region in Russia.

2014

July 17, Ukraine: A Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 crashes in eastern Ukraine near the Russian border, killing all 298 passengers and crew members. The crash occurs in territory where pro-Russian separatists have been battling Ukrainian troops. President Poroshenko says the crash is an act of terror. “I would like to note that we are calling this not an incident, not a catastrophe, but a terrorist act,” he says. Ukrainian and American officials say the plane is shot down by a Russian-made surface-to-air missile, citing satellite images. Poroshenko accuses the separatists of launching the missile, which they deny. Russian president Putin also denies having any role in the disaster. A day after the crash, President Obama says he believes that the rebels shot down the plane. He calls the crash a “global tragedy” and faults Putin for continuing to arm the rebels and for not stopping the fighting. Most analysts say rebels may have thought they were targeting a military transport plane rather than a commercial jet. A day before the crash, the U.S. and Europe impose further sanctions on Russia in response to Putin’s refusal to stop arming the separatists.

August 19: Members of ISIS behead American journalist James Foley, 40, in apparent retaliation for U.S. airstrikes against the group. Foley, who worked for GlobalPost, went missing in Syria in November 2012.

Sept. 2: An ISIS militant decapitates another American journalist, Steven Sotloff, 31, who worked for Time and other news outlets. He was abducted in 2013 in Syria.

Sept. 26: OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A man fired from an Oklahoma food processing plant beheaded a woman with a knife and was attacking another worker when he was shot and wounded by a company official.
-<    NOTE TO SELF: Bring my Gun to a Knife fight…  >-

Oct. 23: NEW YORK (AP) — A hatchet-wielding man attacked a group of patrol officers in a busy commercial district in Queens on Thursday, injuring two before the other officers shot and killed him, New York City police said. A bystander was wounded in the gunfire.
-<    NOTE TO SELF: Bring my Gun to a Knife fight…  >-

Source: Terrorist Attacks in the U.S. or Against Americans

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FRUSTRATED INCORPORATED! NOTHING HAS CHANGED!!

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My Grandpa would be so PROUD! Thank you!

Drew Nelms (1923-2011)